Posts Tagged ‘Technology

26
Dec
10

Auguring the future

I can’t help being fascinated by prognostications about the future. My last post was about online jobs for 2011, and the end of the year provokes a lot of crystal ball gazing. Even heavyweights like IBM indulge in exercising their forecasting skills. You’ve gotta pay at least ¬†some attention to what an outfit with such a solid track record has to say. These are things to happen between now and 2015.

  1. Batteries for your gadgets will last up to ten times longer. The batteries will “breathe” or take in oxygen from the air and react with energy-dense metals to generate energy.
  2. In some devices batteries could be replaced entirely by scavenging energy from our surroundings. Watches that maintain a charge by taking energy from the motion of your wrist, as some do today, is an example. There’s a lot of unused energy around; the problem is transducing it.
  3. IBM plans to recycle much of the energy used in data centers to heat buildings and drive air conditioning. Up to half of the energy of data centers today is just to keep the servers cool, and it goes out to the air again through cooling towers. Hey, I might be able to heat my shower water with my home computers?
  4. They’re expecting 3D communication person to person by hologram like Princes Leia in the first Stars Wars movie.
  5. IBM’s looking at “adaptive traffic systems” that’ll personalize your commute, ¬†predict traffic jams and adjust the flow. (It’s kinda discouraging to think that people will still be grinding away their lives on commutes to awful offices. Let’s go with the holograms and Google’s self-driving vehicles.)
  6. Finally, Big Blue predicts that we ordinary citizens will be “walking sensors” equipped with enough environmental sensors in our phones to keep a running data stream to analysts who can use it to do scientific ecological research.

I’m disappointed that IBM didn’t mention health applications of being walking sensors, so I’ll add another prediction of my own: By 2015 we’ll be wired with sensors alright, but many of them will be plastered on us so continuous data can be collected about how our body is doing 24/7. With that I think we’ll be able to get a lot closer to the idea of personalized medicine and personalized health behavior. There are a lot of companies already working on a range of data collection devices and another five years ought to bring much of it into common use.

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18
Feb
10

Using a couple of self-monitoring tools

I’ve mentioned before that I’m experimenting with e-tools to help me stay on track with my health goals. I’m also doing it to be able to comment on the emerging fields of personal health records and m-health (mobile health). Today I’ll be commenting on an iPhone app I use all the time to track my walking — iTreadmill — and a free graphing program I found about yesterday thanks to @accarmichael  — Tableau Public.

iTreadmill is a popular pedometer using the accelerometer in the iPhone. The app allows the recording of pace and time during a walk or run and calculates other measures.

  • Average Pace (pace over entire walk/run)
  • Average Speed
  • Calories burned
  • Distance
  • Pace (current pace, pace over past 30 secs)
  • Speed (current speed)
  • Step Count
  • Strike Rate (step rate, in steps/min)

I think iTreadmill does a good job recording these parameters, at least sufficient for my needs. They claim to have proprietary technology (trademarked PocketStep) that is supposed to enable the device to measure your movements whether your iPhone is in your pocket, clipped to your belt, or held in your hand. The stride parameter can be adjusted to fit with your stride. The app senses when you stop at, say, a stoplight and detects when you’re moving again so the elapsed time adjusts for interruptions. Pretty much everything else is calculated off your number of steps and time.

The data for each occasion can be stored so you can see your history. The latest version allows you to graph distance, steps, calories burned, and time over the past week, 30, 90 or 180 days. You can export the history by emailing the history file to yourself.

That’s a sore point with me. The FAQ says you can get a “well formatted” table from the email by copying it into a spreadsheet. But all the data from each event is just a string of characters with variable spaces between data elements. It isn’t comma-delimited so you can’t easily separate the data into fields for calculations. I tried various search-and-replace strategies to break it into separate fields but gave it up as too time consuming to be worthwhile. I’ve twice sent emails to iTreadmill asking for help with data formatting and suggesting they build in a better export format, but I’ve gotten no reply or results so far. I ended up manually re-keying my data from iTreadmill into OpenOffice spreadsheet: not my idea of how to facilitate better health behavior.

Indeed, I’m wondering if poor responsiveness isn’t pretty standard for the apps business. I’ve gotta think many of the 100,000 apps for the iPhone are done by one or two developers working out of their mom’s basement. I suspect limited support for technology is going to plague the e-health, m-health movement for some time to come.

That takes me to the next tool: Tableau Public. For me an essential quality of supporting my health program is being able to gather data with a minimum of fuss, store it, and manipulate it with ease. However, the overriding characteristic of the app world — as has been the case with IT for decades — is fragmentation and lack of common standards by which data from a variety of sources can be conveniently combined into something satisfactory. My goal is to export data from the apps I use, store it as a database (with or withyout the help of HealthVault or Google Health) and visualize it in a way that tells me how I’m doing. Since I’d manually re-keyed my iTreadmil ldata I was pleased to learn a versatile, sharable program for visualization has become available. I figured it was an omen to begin shareing my data on this blog, limited as it is.

I started only a couple of days ago with Tableau. It’s a poweful tool that’ll take me some time to master. You need to download a free desktop program. With it you open your spreadsheet or database from within Tableau, and it interprets your sheet to do a lot of the work of getting it ready for display. The resulting display files are stored “in the cloud” on Tableau’s servers. But the site sets the graphics up for embedding into various web apps such as blogs. I’ll be gathering more data, and it appears that Tableau may be a platform for integrating data into a coherent story. So, such as it is, here’s my graph for walking in January and February.

The distance walked is up and down, but when I put in the trend line (dashed line) at least it’s up. That’s encouraging!

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