11
Nov
10

Cancer reading of interest

I saw a review today in the NY Times of Dr. Siddhartha Mukherjees’s book, The Emperor of All Maladies. Supposedly it’s a “biography” of cancer. Evidently he recounts the changing historical conceptions of cancer and the efforts to deal with the disease. Since I worked in the field for 36 years I guess that qualifies as being a part of that history, or at least the recent part.

What interests me is that the reviewer, Janet Maslin, quotes the doctor as saying in the book:

Cancer is a flaw in our growth, but this flaw is deeply entrenched in ourselves…We can rid ourselves of cancer, then, only as much as we can rid ourselves of the processes in our physiology that depend on growth — aging, regeneration, healing, reproduction.

Maslin criticizes the statement as being an “oversimplification”. In what respect? I fully agree with the statement in that cancer comes from the errors inherent in our physiological cell processes or damage to those processes induced by outside influences. Cancer could only be eliminated if our cells ran perfectly for decades or were able to fix every error perfectly. Our cells do a heck of a job, but the reality is that over the long course of our lives errors creep in. I don’t think that overcoming flaws in basic processes can be done (although I don’t want to rule out amazing technologies that might be developed many decades out), so, as I’ve said before, goals and expectations about cancer need to get real.

There’s a kind of upside to the magnitude of the cancer problem. The fear of cancer had driven people to open up their wallets and the treasury to do a huge amount of bio-medical research. All of it contributes to the vast amount of knowledge needed to deal with many maladies and to understand our very nature. There’s still a long way to go. I sometimes wonder where we’d be in life knowledge and medicine without the terror of cancer. Human beings don’t seem very interested in knowledge if it doesn’t have a direct benefit to them.

p.s.: When I was working I’d whip out a credit card and order a book like this from Amazon immediately. Now, however, I’ve got a library card. I went online and placed a hold on the book. After 15 people ahead of me read one of the copies I’ll get hold of it and save the $16.95.

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