14
May
10

Paging Dr Nano…

I’m kind of obsessed with the nanoscale world because it’s the scale at which basic living systems start. The macromolecules of cells — the building blocks of organisms — are really doing meaningful processes down at the nanoscale.

Nanotechnology — the technology of things designed and engineered down to the molecular and atomic level — is beginning to show signs for remarkable devices not far from going on the market. And one of the first, robust markets for nanotech is going to be medical nanotechnology, especially for cancer. I’ve been watching this for a few years years now.

I recently stumbled across a nanotechnology newsletter I hadn’t seen before: Nanowerk. It’s a European site focused on technology developments in European countries. Every country with healthy science and technology resources is steaming ahead with nanotech R&D in anticipation of huge future development. The newsletter circulates 10 to 20 briefs per day.

An article from May 4 really got my attention. It’s titled: “Informatics moves into nanomedicine,” and reports on research recently published in Pediatric Research. There are what I think are some interesting assertions about the near future of the field.

…some nanoparticles and nanodevices have already been approved or are about to be approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration, including, for example, superparamagnetic nanoparticles to detect metastases in some types of cancer or new devices that combine microfluids or nanosensors to detect tumours.

These applications of nanomaterials open up new prospects for personalized medicine, the authors add, indicating that classical clinical studies need to be redesigned to adapt to the advances taking place in genomics, proteomics and pharmacogenetics. “The introduction of nanoparticles that can target different molecules or groups of atoms with high precision can significantly advance the personalization of clinical procedures”, the article says.

But the statement that blew my mind is:

The possibility of biomolecular devices acting not only in vitro but also in vivo within diseased human organisms is also opening up new prospects, where biomolecular automata could even intervene to intelligently deliver drugs to the diseased regions of the human body just where they are needed.

In this respect, the authors note that research on a “Doctor in a Cell” is already in progress. This is a genetically modified cell that can operate in a human body. It contains a biological computer that can process and analyse external biological signals, emit a diagnosis and deliver the desired molecular therapeutic signal to treat the patient.

The doc-in-a-cell is “already in progress“?! Not exactly the Fantastic Voyage, but close enough to get me excited!

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