21
Apr
10

good news from the abyssal plain

I saw something the other day about life on Earth that gave me a lift. Science Now reported that the Census of Marine Life, after a decade of surveying marine organisms all over the world, has documented that 90% of the ocean’s biomass consists of microbes, larvae, and plankton. The total mass of these little critters is equivalent to 240 billion elephants! Elephant-equivalents. The researchers pulled the creatures from the sea itself, from the mud, from the deep-sea vents, and from the bottom of the abyssal plain. (The phrase “abyssal plain” gives me the chills!)

Using new generation sequences researchers identified 18 million DNA sequences. Mich Sogan, a Woods Hole scientist, says “there could be as many as a billion bacteria and archaea, another group of single-cell organisms like bacteria.” A couple of interesting findings are: 1) the microbial diversity increased the deeper they looked in the water column, 2) but sometimes a microbe’s environment  is simply one other organism.

A bonus interest for me is to learn that the richest marine organism environment is the plateau off the Pacific Northwest Coast where 25,000 to 35,000 different microorganisms live in each litre of sea water. I’m writing this post from Beaverton, Oregon, where my wife and I are planning to move next month. So I can just drive to the coast and wade in the rich microbial soup.

All this lifts me because I relish the thought that here on Earth, whether or not we humans commit to being responsible stewards to the one life-perfect planet we know of, the richness of life code on the planet is ineradicable. Human affairs often discourage me, but life is indomitable. The Earth has occupied a sweet-spot for life for billions of years and will continue to for many more.

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