17
Mar
10

playing by the rules

Last week I read something disappointing. An article (that I didn’t bookmark) said that in some survey Americans don’t see climate change as as much of concern as a year or two ago. That amazes me. I know it was a horrendous winter on the East Coast, and some hanky-panky dug up about some scientists involved in climate research exposed the all-too-human backside of science; but how can people with bigger stakes in the future than I have become complacent about something with such far-reaching consequences?

I’m 64 so I won’t personally experience the full consequences of climate change; I’ll have  been recycled by the worms well before the whole thing plays out. I don’t have any children, but I do have a couple of young-adult grandchildren by way of marriage who I care about. They call me “Uncle Dave.” But I don’t see how people with responsibility for tomorrow’s children can get blase about what’s going to happen 30 to 100 years from now. As I pointed out in one of my first posts to this blog, the children being born today have a 50/50 chance of living to 100. When I see a tyke being wheeled down the sidewalk in one of those strollers that looks like a spaceship escape pod I feel a pang of sadness to think that he or she might have to live in a badly degraded world with perhaps unprecedented human turmoil.

Then I read an opinion piece from the LA Times that expressed my perception of the situation very well. In a column titled “The Earth has its own set of rules,” B.E. Mahall and F.H. Bormann said the following:

The Earth has its own set of rules, solidly grounded in laws of physics and chemistry and emergent principles of geology and biology. Unlike our economic model, these are not artificial constructs. They are real, and they govern. Earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, tornadoes, 100-year floods, massive wildfires and disease epidemics are dramatic examples of parts of nature, neither all service nor all harm, creating and destroying, and governed by rules that are indifferent to humans. Our anthropocentric economic model for interacting with the world ignores and is proving to be incompatible with Earth’s rules, and is therefore on a direct collision course with them.

To achieve a more accurate model of our relation to nature, we need to see ourselves as part of nature, governed by nature (not economics), beholden to nature for ecosystem services and subject to nature’s disturbances.

Precisely! The Earth is a platform that has occupied a sweet-spot around the sun for several billion years that has permitted the most complex things in the universe we know of to evolve. Humans are at the apex of this process having evolved a capacity to comprehend the workings of Earth’s rules, to have some degree of insight and foresight about what might happen down the road, and a capacity to make choices and decisions that affect the whole. But, overall, a lot of people seem content to continue with business as uaual and just wait to see how it all ends up.

Earth is a unique place for a prolonged, open-ended experiment with life. The outcome is not determined. The universe is neither for us or against us: it’s indifferent to our welfare. It’s up to us to actively make it work out well…or not.

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